Alamanicus

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in ruins

Posted by on in Explore
The best preserved Roman spa north of the alps, the Badenweiler Roman Bath ruins ("Badenweiler Römische Badruine" in German), known at the time as Aqua Villae, were first constructed in the 1st century A.D., not long after the area was first conquered by the Romans. The original building, consisting of two pools fed by the natural warm springs, was subsequently expanded to include a reception area, changing facilities, sauna, two cold pools, and stone terraces. The facility would have been visited by serving Roman legionnaires and veterans who ...
Hits: 5044
Rate this blog entry:
1

Posted by on in Explore
Rötteln Castle is one of the most imposing castles in south west Germany and is today, after Hochberg and Hohenbaden, the third largest ruin in Baden. It's position on the southern edge of the Black Forest close to the Rhine, above the Wiese valley (near the modern town of Lörrach), and its extensive fortifications made it one of the most significant castles in south west Germany. Although first mentioned in 1259, the castle was probably first built long before then. It was the seat of the Lords of Rötteln (who first appear in the historical re...
Hits: 5134
Rate this blog entry:
1

Posted by on in Explore
Sausenberg Castle today is a modest ruin, barely sign-posted, gradually being reclaimed by the trees at the western edge of the Black Forest, near the modern day town of Kandern. In its day, however, Sausenberg was the seat of the Margrave of Hachberg-Sausenberg, a near 200 year dynasty out of the House of Baden that accumulated most of the land of the south western corner of Germany, that today is called Markgräflerland (Margrave's Land). The Castle of Sausenberg The first record of Sausenberg is dated to 1120, when the 668m (c. 2200ft) peak...
Hits: 5988
Rate this blog entry:
3

Posted by on in Explore
Hochburg (literally: Citadel) is the second largest castle in the Baden region of south west Germany. Also known as Hachberg after its 11th century founder, Dietrich von Hachberg, the castle soon came into the possession of the Margraves of Baden who dominated the south west corner of Germany from the late 11th century. The Rise and Fall of Baden-Hachberg When Margrave Hermann IV died at Antioch in 1190 during the Third Crusade, the Margraviate was split amongst his two sons. Whilst Hermann V continued the main line of succession based at the...
Hits: 5032
Rate this blog entry:
5

Posted by on in Five Chateaux Route
Calling a castle "View Castle" - which is what the original German name for Pflixbourg translates to - seems only marginally less pointless than calling it "Castle Castle", given that castles were generally located in positions where they commanded the surrounding area. Although Pflixbourg is lower than its larger Five Chateaux Route neighbour Hohlandsbourg, its position in the forest of the Vosges mountains does indeed give it sweeping views across the lower Munster valley before it curls out of sight around the mountain towards Colmar. There...
Hits: 4222
Rate this blog entry:
6

Posted by on in Five Chateaux Route
The Three Towers are a stop on the Five Chateaux Route and comprise the three castles of Dagsbourg, Wahlenbourg, and Weckmund, grouped together in the same location on a hill above the small village of Husseren-les-Chateaux, near the town of Eguisheim, southwest of Colmar. The castles are well worth a visit if for no other reason than you get a medieval three for one deal. Schisms Great and Small The oldest of the three castles is Wahlenbourg, first constructed by Count Hugh (Hugo) IV of Eguisheim in 1006 and located on the highest ground, be...
Hits: 4141
Rate this blog entry:
6
Posted by on in Five Chateaux Route
The Five Chateaux Route takes in the five castles of Dagsbourg, Wahlenbourg, Weckmund, Hohlandsbourg, and Pflixbourg, all located in close proximity in the forest at the eastern edge of the Vosges mountains, west of Colmar, in the Alsace region of France. With the exception of Hohlandsbourg, which was actually a fortified building site when Alamanicus visited in 2012, the chateaux are all ruins, so maybe this tour might better be described as the Four Piles of Rubble and a Building Site Route. It is, nevertheless, a scenic tour and comes thorou...
Hits: 3224
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Explore
Kastelburg sits in the Black Forest north east of Freiburg, on the slopes above Waldkirch and the river Elz. It is reached from Waldkirch train station by a short forest walk that is guarded by prominent figures from its history. Built sometime after 1254 to defend the town, control trade through the valley, and generally act as the focal point of the territory of the small Schwarzenberger dynasty, the castle was destroyed nearly 400 years later during the Thirty Years War.  By 1293 the Lords of Schwarzenberg had become vassals of the Austrian...
Hits: 5609
Rate this blog entry:
5

Posted by on in Explore
Sat on top of a vine covered hill, 86 metres (nearly 300ft) above the nearby town of Staufen, Staufen Castle traces its history as far back as Roman times, with finds that suggest a Roman watch tower occupied the spot where the ruins now stand (before ol' Alamanicus and his boys booted the Romans back across the Rhine, that is). Construction of the castle that you can, at least in part, see today was started around 1100 by a local lord, Adalbert von Staufen. The Staufen line died out on the death of George Leo von Staufen in 1602, and after 160...
Tagged in: castle ruins staufen
Hits: 4792
Rate this blog entry:
5

Posted by on in Explore
Old Alamanicus got a bit excited as he walked through Badenweiler Kurpark (Spa park) when he came across the ruins of Aqua Villae - the old Roman baths that he helped put into the very state one can see them in today, i.e. rubble. He and his mates were having a little party after kicking some Roman butt and, well, one thing led to another, and before they knew it, the ceiling caved in and the walls fell down. He was, however, on his way to another set of ruins - Baden Castle (or Burg Baden as they say locally) - so did not linger at the scene o...
Tagged in: badenweiler castle ruins
Hits: 4636
Rate this blog entry:
5

Posted by on in Explore
The small castle of Neuenfels is located just inside the Black Forest, above the village of Britzingen, with panoramic views across the Rhine plain to the Vosges mountains in France. Originally built before 1250, the castle was until the 16th century the seat of the noble von Neuenfels family, who are first mentioned in 1307. In the course of time the von Neuenfels held offices as bailiffs in Badenweiler and Staufen, as the Reeve* in Rötteln, and as Abbot of St. Trudpert. The family acquired through purchase or marriage property in Britzingen, ...
Tagged in: castle neuenfels ruins
Hits: 3835
Rate this blog entry:
5

Trip Reports

Login With Facebook

 

 

Alamanicus

 

Follow us on foursquare

 

Alamanicus To Go

 

Photography

Alamanicus posts some of his favourite images to 500px

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim, by Alamanicus on 500px.com

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim by Alamanicus

Advertisement