Alamanicus

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in habsburg

Posted by on in Timeline
Count Radbot of Klettgau builds Habsburg castle near the village of the same name, then part of the Swabian county of Klettgau, now a municipality in the district of Brugg, in the Swiss canton of Aargau. His grandson Otto II takes the name von Habsburg from the castle, thus establishing what was to become one of the most powerful dynasties in European history. (Year is approximate - actual date is somewhere between 1020 - 1030). Image Credit: By Roland Zumbühl (Picswiss), Arlesheim (Commons:Picswiss project) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/...
Hits: 3538
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
Hartman IV, Duke of Kyburg dies, and with him the House of Kyburg. The House of Habsburg eventually acquires the Kyburger land (between Lake Constance and Lake Zurich in modern day Switzerland) and titles, part of the continuing expansion of the Habsburg empire.
Tagged in: habsburg kyburg timeline
Hits: 3441
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
Having manoeuvred the Habsburg family into a position of power in the preceding decades, the 55 year old Count Rudolph IV of Habsburg is crowned King Rudolph I of Germany on 24th October 1273. Following the collapse of the Hohenstaufen dynasty and the fragmentation of the Swabian ruling classes in 1254, Rudolph - godson to the last effective Hohenstaufen ruler Frederick II - had established himself as one of the most powerful Swabian lords. Through marriage - his wife was related to the House of Kyburg, enabling him to seize the Kyburger asse...
Hits: 3113
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
Having been granted 'Reichsfrei' status (governed directly by the King/Emperor, without any feudal overlord) by the Hohenstaufen kings, the independence of the three Swabian regions of Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden (on the shores of Lake Lucerne in modern day Switzerland) is threatened by the rise of the Habsburgs. The three cantons take the opportunity presented by the death of the Habsburg King Rudolph I of Germany earlier in 1291 to sign the Federal Charter on August 1st, forming an alliance for mutual defence against a common enemy. Since 1...
Hits: 3009
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
On the Rütli, a meadow (centre bottom in the image) on the shore of Lake Lucerne below Seelisberg, the three allied Swiss cantons of Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden re-affirm their alliance with an oath - the 'Rütlischwur'. First sworn on 8th November 1307, the oath is today re-enacted in the same meadow annually on August 1st, anniversary of the signing of the Federal Charter in 1291, as part of the Swiss National Day celebrations.
Hits: 3211
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
On 9th December 1315, having defeated an Habsburg army in the Battle of Morgarten the previous month, the three allied Swiss cantons of Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden sign the Pact of Brunnen, at the town of Brunnen (pictured) on the north east shore of Lake Lucerne, turning their alliance into a formal confederacy. Known to history as the Old Swiss Confederacy, in less than 40 years the three become eight as the cities of Lucerne (in 1332), Zurich (1351), and Bern (1353), and the cantons of Glarus and Zug (1352) join the confederacy.
Hits: 3201
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
In the Battle of Sempach, fought on 9th July 1386 2km (1.25 miles) outside the town of Sempach (battlefield pictured), Habsburg forces opposing the expansion of Lucerne interests are routed by troops of the Old Swiss Confederacy. The defeat decimates the ranks of Swabian nobility who fell in the Habsburg cause. For the Swiss, the victory establishes the confederacy as a significant political and military force and heralds the growth of the eight cantons of the Old Swiss Confederacy into thirteen. Little more than a century later, after the Be...
Hits: 3411
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
Following rising tensions between the Habsburgs and the Swiss Three Leaugues (an associate of the Old Swiss Confederacy that eventually became the east Swiss canton of Graubünden), on 20th January 1499 Habsburg troops occupied the Val Müstair and plundered the Benedictine Convent of Saint John. Although the Habsburgs were driven back by the Swiss, and an armistice signed on 2nd February, the Swiss had already called on the Old Swiss Confederacy for help, and when troops from Uri encountered some Habsburg troops returning home, they did not tak...
Hits: 4199
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in Timeline
The Protestant Reformation of 1517 heralds a long period of religious tension between the Catholic establishment of the Holy Roman Empire on one side, and the newly converted Protestant states on the other. A significant political undercurrent is the challenge the Protestant states present to the authority of the ruling Catholic Habsburg dynasty. In 1531 in Switzerland (nominally part of the Holy Roman Empire but effectively autonomous and free from Empire influence following victory in the Swabian War of 1499), the Second Battle of Kappel is ...
Hits: 3301
Rate this blog entry:
0
The northern Swiss Plateau was settled by the Alemanni when they moved into the void left by a crumbling Western Roman Empire in 406A.D. By the end of the 1st millennium, the Alemanni had become part of the Frankish empire, under which the Duchy of Alamannia, later becoming the Duchy of Swabia, extended its influence across a large part of what was to become Switzerland - the cities of Freiburg in Germany and Bern in Switzerland both owe their foundation to the Swabian Zähringen family. It was the Swabian Holy Roman Emperors - the Hohenstaufen...
Hits: 4013
Rate this blog entry:
0

Trip Reports

Login With Facebook

 

 

Alamanicus

 

Follow us on foursquare

 

Alamanicus To Go

 

Photography

Alamanicus posts some of his favourite images to 500px

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim, by Alamanicus on 500px.com

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim by Alamanicus

Advertisement