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Karlsruhe Palace is located in the heart of the modern city of Karlsruhe. It was built in 1715 by Charles William (Karl Wilhelm) III, Margrave of Baden-Durlach, when he relocated the capitol of the Margraviate from nearby Durlach. Said to have been dreamed up as he rested during a hunt - Karlsruhe translates literally to 'Charles repose' - the impressive palace building, and specifically its tower, is at the centre of a fan shaped layout, with 32 streets radiating outwards like spokes from a wheel. In 1785 a cupola was added to the tower, and v...
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Posted by on in Explore
Rötteln Castle is one of the most imposing castles in south west Germany and is today, after Hochberg and Hohenbaden, the third largest ruin in Baden. It's position on the southern edge of the Black Forest close to the Rhine, above the Wiese valley (near the modern town of Lörrach), and its extensive fortifications made it one of the most significant castles in south west Germany. Although first mentioned in 1259, the castle was probably first built long before then. It was the seat of the Lords of Rötteln (who first appear in the historical re...
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Posted by on in Timeline
The House of Baden is established in 1112A.D. when Herman II of the House of Zähringen awards himself the title of Margrave of Baden, named after the family seat of Castle Hohenbaden (pictured), near modern day Baden-Baden. The Margraviate of Baden was a relatively minor fief, or vassal territory, of the Holy Roman Empire, and over the course of much of its history was divided and reunited according to the internal politics of the ruling family. The main House of Baden (1112 - 1535) spun off the branch of Baden-Hachberg (1190 - 1415), which it...
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Posted by on in Timeline
The last of the House of Baden-Hachberg, founded in 1212, becomes extinct following the death of Otto II von Baden-Hachberg. Impoversihed, Otto had already sold the family possessions (including the family seat at Hochburg Castle) and titles to Bernhard I, Margrave of Baden, in 1415. The junior branch of the Baden-Hachberg line, the Hachberg-Sausenbergs, continue for nearly another century before also passing into history.
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Posted by on in Timeline
On the death of Philip von Hachberg-Sausenberg in Montpellier, France, on 9th September 1503, the Hachberg-Sausenberg branch of the House of Baden dies out. First established in 1306 as a branch of the Baden-Hachberg line, itself a branch of the main Baden line, the Hachberg-Sausenberg lands and title in Germany (Philip also had interests in France and Switzerland which passed to his daughter) is inherited by Christoph (Christopher) I von Baden, Margrave of Baden, thus returning them to the main Baden line, though not for long. The former Hac...
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Posted by on in Timeline
In 1515 Christopher I, Margrave of Baden, divided his territories amongst three of his sons, Philip, Bernhard, and Ernest, who administered the Margraviate on his behalf. Although Philip I inherited the Margraviate of Baden on the death of his father in 1527, his brothers resisted any attempts to consolidate rule back into his hands. In 1533 Philip I died (buried, as is usual for the Margraves of Baden at that time, in the Collegiate Church in Baden-Baden - pictured). The Margraviate of Baden is split between his two brothers, Ernest and Bernh...
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