Alamanicus

alamanicus

alamanicus

Alamanicus is wandering his old Alemanni haunts, revisiting the places where once he used to drink, carouse, and beat up the odd Roman legionnaire or two. Things have moved on since his day, and the old Alemanni country now lies across south west Germany, French Alsace, and northern Switzerland. Cut through by the mighty Rhine, it is an area of great beauty, and a lot has happened there since Alamanicus last walked this land.

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The town of Neuenburg am Rhein sits on the banks of the Rhine in south west Germany, about half way between Freiburg and the Swiss city of Basel. With a population of less than 10,000, its small size today belies its historical significance as an important crossing point of the Rhine. Its strategic location on the river and as a border town was both boom and bust for the town. Once grand enough to support its own cathedral, the town's history is punctuated by disaster, both natural and man-made. Click any picture below to view larger versions ...
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The Klemmbach is a stream that rises in the mountains of the southern Black Forest in south west Germany, and flows west through the towns of Badenweiler, Müllheim, and Neuenburg before emptying into the Rhine. In Müllheim it gave rise to a thriving tannery industry that established itself along its course in the 18th and 19th centuries, with numerous tanneries and associated businesses springing up on its banks. As well as providing an important water resource in the tanning process itself, the Klemmbach was also used to drive mills and flush ...
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The Baden wine trail nestles amongst more than 160 picturesque kilometres (100 miles) along the western edge of the Black Forest. It leads through the most beautiful and significant wine-growing regions of Baden: Ortenau, Breisgau, Kaiserstuhl, Tuniberg, and Markgräflerland - and forms a kind of Viticultural Black Forest that reaches down to the Rhine plain. Baden Wine Trail Gallery The following images were taken on Ascension Day in May, when a long stretch of the Markgräflerland Wine Trail road between Staufen and Müllheim was closed to all...
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The Kurhaus is a venue located at the western end of the park, at the foot of the castle ruins in Badenweiler, a small town nestled in the western edge of the Black Forest in south west Germany. The foundation stone of the original Kurhaus was laid in 1851, and by 1853 the building was in use as a pump room and gathering place. That same year the building began to be used as a venue for concerts.       With increasing visitor numbers the demand for the thermal waters grew, and in 1863/4 the source was reviewed and the...
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First mentioned as a fortified complex ("Burg") in 1125 and used as a chapel, Bürgeln was built by local land-owner Lord Werner von Kaltenbach, who subsequently donated all his possessions to the St. Blasien Benedictine monastery. Under monastic control, Bürgeln became the seat of the St. Blasien Provost, the religious representative and church tax collector for the local area, including the convent at Sitzenkirch and the nearby communities of Obereggenen and Marzell. Schloss Bürgeln Gallery During the peasant's revolt of 1525 the castle wa...
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Not a perfect day for flying, but the local gliding club were having an open day. To be honest, I like my aircraft to come with engines, and at least four of them at that, preferably on each wing. But intrepid aviator that I am, and ignoring the fact that winch-launched gliding has always terrified me - it's just not natural to be catapulted into the sky - I had a go myself. Actually I was shamed into it by the 7-year old in our group who took to the air like he was born with wings and wanted to go straight back up as soon as he landed. And wh...
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Today is Ascension Day, "Christi Himmelfahrt" in German, and a public holiday. They closed a 14km (8.5 mile) stretch of wine-country road to motor traffic, and between 10:00 and 18:00 the greatest peril pedestrians faced was from speeding bicycles wreaking revenge for the fact that it is normally they that are the prey of speeding cars on these narrow winding roads at the foot of the Black Forest. The temporarily pedestrianised road runs between Staufen and Müllheim and, after an opening ceremony at the village of Laufen, almost half way bet...
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Müllheim is a small town in south west Germany, about half way between Freiburg and Basel in Switzerland. It sits at western edge of the Black Forest, where the mountains descend down to the Rhine plain, and the hills around the town have clear views across to the Vosges mountains in France. It is traditionally the centre of Markgräflerland, an area ruled by Margraves, equivalent to the English March Lords - nobility who, because they commanded territories on the borders of a realm, were granted greater autonomy and more military freedom than ...
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I was hoping to post a large gallery of Spring images, with blue skies and landscapes so colourful you could almost hear the birds singing just by looking at the pictures. There would be photos of green shoots and daffodil lined roads filled with convertible cars configured as nature intended them to be - roof down - and pick-your-own plots bursting with colour and crowded with people assembling DIY bouquets. But Spring came late this year and, it would seem, took one look around the joint, saw what the unusually long dark winter had done to t...
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There are a few variations on the German name for carnival, but here in the south west corner use of the largely Swiss-German name "Fasnacht" (or the alternate spelling of Fastnacht) and its Alemannish version Fasnet betrays the shared Alemannic heritage of the area. Elsewhere it is known "Fasching". Gallery (Click any image to enlarge and scroll through the gallery) Although carnival season actually begins each year at 11:11 a.m. on November 11th, the carnival parades mark the beginning of lent - the 40 days of fasting leading up to Easte...
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Since 1932 mad, crazy people have attached planks of wood (or these days planks of high tech carbon fibre) to their feet in order to ski for a very short distance in a straight line down a ramp on the side of a hill in the German Black Forest town of Titisee-Neustadt. After some 100m of this rather boring version of downhill skiing, by which time the skier is approaching speeds of 100km per hour (over 60mph), the ramp all of a sudden is not there. This is the point at which the 'skiing' becomes 'flying', and things get very exciting indeed. ...
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Karlsruhe Palace is located in the heart of the modern city of Karlsruhe. It was built in 1715 by Charles William (Karl Wilhelm) III, Margrave of Baden-Durlach, when he relocated the capitol of the Margraviate from nearby Durlach. Said to have been dreamed up as he rested during a hunt - Karlsruhe translates literally to 'Charles repose' - the impressive palace building, and specifically its tower, is at the centre of a fan shaped layout, with 32 streets radiating outwards like spokes from a wheel. In 1785 a cupola was added to the tower, and v...
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Assuming his fingers can take the cold, Alamanicus will be adding more pictures to this gallery as the winter progresses. If you would like to get notifications when new images are added, you can 'Like' Alamanicus' Facebook page, or follow him on Google+ or Twitter. Click on any image below to scroll through the gallery...
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The best preserved Roman spa north of the alps, the Badenweiler Roman Bath ruins ("Badenweiler Römische Badruine" in German), known at the time as Aqua Villae, were first constructed in the 1st century A.D., not long after the area was first conquered by the Romans. The original building, consisting of two pools fed by the natural warm springs, was subsequently expanded to include a reception area, changing facilities, sauna, two cold pools, and stone terraces. The facility would have been visited by serving Roman legionnaires and veterans who ...
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Müllheim is a small market town of approximately 12,000 people, located on the B3 road between Freiburg to the north and Basel to the south. The Black Forest rises to the east, and to the west the Rhine plain extends towards the French Vosges Mountains. The town itself can trace its roots back to 758 A.D. when the area was part of the Frankish empire, but remains of a 1st/2nd century A.D. Roman villa have been found where St Martins church now stands. Müllheim was first allowed to hold a market in 1698, and in 1810 the Grand Duke of Baden gr...
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Posted by on in Müllheim Town Tour
Markgräfler Museum Müllheim im Blankenhornpalais (Markgräfler Museum in the Blankenhorn Townhouse) Built around 1800 in the early classical townhouse style, with architectural influences taken from neighbouring France, the Blankenhorn townhouse was initially the guesthouse "Zur Krone" (The Crown), run by the Blankenhorn family (a prominent Müllheim family - Adolf Blankenhorn was the first president of the German Winegrowers Association in 1874, his son was chief of the Baden police until removed in 1933 because of his opposition to the newly e...
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Marktplatz (Market Place) A market has operated here since 1698, when Margrave Frederick the Great (Frederick VII, Margrave of Baden-Durlach) granted Müllheim the right to hold one. The sizeable area that had existed in the 17th century was developed in the 18th century, and in 1726 was cobbled. Until 1825 the Stadthaus housed the municipal offices and between 1789 and 1846 the Winzerhaus served as a school building. In September 1848 Gustav von Struve (a leader of the short-lived rebellion of 1848 - 1849) proclaimed the Republic of Baden fro...
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"Alte Schol" ehem. Schlachthaus (Old School and Former Slaughterhouse) First erected in 1824/5, this building was initially used as the municipal office, following the grant of a town charter to Müllheim by Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden, in 1810. The lower floor (which featured a trapdoor that opened out above the river, the more easily to wash away the waste) served as a slaughterhouse until 1912 (the neighbouring "Zur Alte Gerberei" building was the old tannery). In 1867, the upper floor of the old slaughterhouse was changed to educa...
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Frick-Mühle (Frick's Mill) First mentioned in 1392, the mill on the Klemmbach river was originally a manor farm belonging to the Lords of Baden. In 1690 it was taken over by Bartlin Frick and remained in the possession of the Frick family until the mill was decommissioned in 1910. At the end of the 18th century the property consisted of two sloping houses arranged together: the dwelling with mill-room and the servant's quarters with a pergola. Two mill wheels can be found on the right side of the building, past which the mill canal flowed. T...
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Dekanat (Deanery) The existing protestant parsonage (or rectory) and deanery is the third building to be erected on this site. After the reformation in 1556 (when the Margrave of Baden-Durlach established the protestant religion in his territories) the last catholic priest relinquished his private rectory. This first building was burnt down in 1633 during the Thirty Years' War. During the 1660's a new building was constructed what is now the parsonage garden. When this second building fell into disrepair the current house was erected in 1769...
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Alamanicus posts some of his favourite images to 500px

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim, by Alamanicus on 500px.com

Autumnal Glow in Müllheim by Alamanicus

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